Category: Mets

Introducing Mets General Manager Brodie Van Wagenen

The New York Mets recently filled their front office vacancy by hiring Brodie Van Wagenen to replace Sandy Alderson as the organization’s GM.

Van Wagenen has established himself as one of the most prominent professionals in the sports business industry as an agent with the Creative Artists Agency. As the Co-Head of CAA’s Sports’ Baseball division, Brodie has represented many high profile clients, including  Ryan Howard, Robinson Canó, and Ryan Zimmerman. He has also had a number of current Mets as clients such as Yoenis Céspedes, Noah Syndergaard, Tim Tebow, and Cy Young candidate Jacob deGrom.

Although he does not have any front office experience, the Mets have the utmost confidence that Van Wagenen will be able to use the skills he has acquired over his career to guide the Mets’ front office, making the team relevant in the MLB landscape once again.

His knowledge of all things baseball makes him a perfect candidate for his new role, any many professionals in the industry agree.

“He’s built to run things; he’s built to lead,” said his ex-teammate Kyle Peterson. ““In many ways, he’s been preparing for this role for the last 25 years. He was one of the leaders in his industry. It’s not like he needed a job and I know he wouldn’t have taken any job. He’s going to surprise people who don’t think he’s ready. He has a million things to learn, but if you’re assuming he can’t learn them, you’d be wrong.’’

“He lives in this market, he knows our team, knows the pace of the city, said Mets Assistant GM John Ricco.” “So he doesn’t have the institutional knowledge, well, we have a lot of people in-house that do. Can we cover it? Those are the questions I was asking myself. I’m a little less a believer that this is a real leap of faith. I think he brings a lot of the things the good GMs have already and we can cover the things he doesn’t have.”

While being a front office member of a New York team is never easy, the consensus is that his transition into his new position will be relatively smooth and will bring the same impact he had on his clients as an agent to the entire Mets franchise as their leader.

 

Featured Image via Flickr/ Doug Kerr

David Wright to Play in Final Home Stand Before Likely Retiring

David Wright hasn’t played an MLB game since 2016, and many fans around the league thought he might never make a return to the field after battling lingering back and shoulder injuries, but the Mets have announced their intentions to start the captain one final time on September 29th before he likely retires from the game.

Wright has been the face of the Mets franchise for a long time. He has been on the club since 2004 and has experienced his share of success during his years in the Big Apple. Over the course of his career, he has been selected to seven All-Star Games while winning the Gold Glove Award and the Silver Slugger Award twice. He has shown tremendous dedication and loyalty to the Mets organization which earned him the title of “Captain” in 2013.

You can’t deny the impact that Wright has had both on and off the field. From day one, he has dedicated himself to the organization and making it the best possible place to play the sport he loves.

He has solidified himself as one of the best players in Mets history. He is the franchise’s career leader in RBIs (970), hits (1,777), runs (949), and stolen bases (196), all while batting .296 in his career.

This will be the end of the road for “Captain America,” but it is impossible to undervalue the effect he has had New York Mets baseball. He will forever bleed orange and blue.

David Wright is a Mets icon, one of the finest players and people ever to wear the uniform, Mets uniform or any uniform, and clearly our fan favorite,” said COO Jeff Wilpon.

 

Featured Image via Keith Allison

 

Jacob deGrom ties MLB record with 25th straight starts allowing three runs or fewer

Jacob deGrom has been outstanding this season, maintaining a 1.68 ERA to go along with 230 strikeouts. He continued his historic campaign last night by making MLB history, tying the record for 25 straight starts allowing three runs or fewer, a record that dates back to 1913.

Despite this accomplishment, deGrom remains focused on the task at hand: winning baseball games.

“I honestly have not been looking at stuff like that, just trying to get ready for my next start,” deGrom said. “I am out there trying to put this team in a position to win. I don’t like giving up runs.”

Mickey Calloway likes what he sees from his ace, but is even more impressed by his attitude when he takes the field. “He’s been the best pitcher in all of baseball,” Callaway said. “It’s grit and determination. He just won’t be beaten.”

As usual, deGrom didn’t pick up the win. He went six strong innings against the Dodgers while striking out six and allowing only two hits and one earned run. However, the Mets only offered the All-Star one run worth of run support, so he got the typical no decision he is used to. That one run also came off his own bat when he drove in Jay Bruce with a single that put his club on the board.

His teammates feel for deGrom as he deserves to have a better record than 8-8. “It is what we come to expect from Jake every time. It is almost not fair. We expect him to go out there and pitch seven innings and give up zero or one run every time. For him to keep doing that and then not get these W’s is unfortunate.”

Every time people doubt his abilities and argue that he shouldn’t win the Cy Young Award, the young pitcher gives them a reason to reconsider.

 

Featured Image via Flickr/slgckgc

Jacob deGrominates the Philadelphia Phillies

In yet another spectacular performance by two-time All-Star Jacob deGrom, the Mets pitcher pitched a complete game while allowing no earned runs, lowering his ERA to an MLB-best 1.71.

His attitude towards the game is what makes him one of the best, determined to blank his opponents by any means necessary. “I definitely wanted to go out there and throw the ball well,” deGrom said. “But every time I take the mound, I want to put up zeros. What other guys do is out of my control.”

Eight innings deep, the Mets ace had thrown 99 pitches and was due up third in the batting order as the Amazins came to bat. Typically, MLB managers would pinch hit in a situation like this in an attempt to add some extra run support to cushion their lead, but when a player is throwing the way deGrom was, this is no easy decision to make. His pitching coach left it up to Jacob.

“Do you want it?” Dave Eiland said to his pitcher. “Yeah, I’ll finish it,” deGrom replied. “You sure you want it?” Eiland continued. “You don’t have to.” “I want to finish it,” deGrom said. The rest is history.

This makes two wins in a row for the Cy Young candidate, a stat that has not come easily to the 30-year-old thus far this season. Despite his excellence, he has struggled to put tallies in the win column, through no fault of his own. This can be attributed to New York’s lack of offensive prowess.

The Mets have had a tough time putting up runs when deGrom is on the mound. In fact, he ranks 4th to last in run support per game with an average of 3.76 runs behind him per nine innings. As a result, he only holds an 8-7 record this season.

However, his win-loss totals should not cover up the fact that deGrom has been arguably the best pitcher in all of baseball. He is the only pitcher to have an ERA this low in the last 18 years with at least 25 starts under his belt besides Zack Greinke in 2015.

He makes a strong case for the Cy Young Award, bestowed upon the best pitcher from each league in the MLB. Jacob has undoubtedly earned the right to be in the conversation, and if the voters of Baseball’s Writers’ Association of America can overlook his modest win total, he is deserving of this recognition, to say the least.

Mets manager Mickey Calloway agrees with this assertion, saying that “Jacob has continued to prove why he is probably the front-runner at this point.” He has also been quoted stating, “If we ended the season right now, he should win it.”

It’s not every day that you see a pitcher in the majors with an earned run average south of 2.00, and if this honor eludes him merely because he is on a club that can’t produce runs to back up his dominance, then the league seriously needs to contemplate the criteria by which they give out the coveted award.

 

Featured Image via Flickr/Keith Allison